See Anew [on Merely A Thought Monday]

baconwrapped pears copy

It seems that everything during the pandemic is a study of circumstance-driven-change. For instance, I am a painter of people. I’ve never been interested in still life studies. Even in school, I cringed at the bowls of fruit placed before us by the instructor. Shape, shade, blah-blah-blah. Give me figure drawing any day! Suddenly, to my great surprise, I am photographing big bowls of fruit. They are gorgeous. I’m thinking about a painting featuring fruit.  What’s happening to me?

The devil is in the pandemic detail. We used to go to the store everyday. We used to buy what we needed for the next 24-48 hours. There were no big piles of fruit, no explosions of color in the fruit bowl or waves of color rolling across the counter. Now, in the time of pandemic, we stock up. We are – like you – buying massive amounts of bananas and oranges and apples and pears. They are, to an artist’s eye, when assembled, simply beautiful. They are, I suspect to an accountant’s eye, also beautiful, but my thoughts stray beyond merely eating.

Beautiful.

We are also in a fit of food experimentation. To delay our need to go into the wild COVID world and shop, we comb the empty larder, asking “What do we have? What can we make with what we have?” We throw our random ingredient list into the Google pool and voila! Yummy options emerge. Bacon wrapped pears. Oh. My. God. It never would have occurred to my bear-brain to wrap a pear in bacon. I savored it. I moaned. My eyes rolled back in my head.

Beautiful. Delicious.

When you study change processes, you bumble across something akin to a rule. It goes like this: if you know where you are going, then it is not really change; it is controlled reordering of what already exists. It may look new but is really the same old wolf in new sheep’s clothing.

Change is what happens when you step into unknown and strange lands, when all of the old points-of-orientation are gone. Only then will you step into something new and surprising. Only then will you see without the old dulling filter. For me, apparently, change looks like a big bowl of beautiful fruit.

 

read Kerri’s blog post about BACON WRAPPED PEARS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

banana copy

Play [on DR Thursday]

Sometimes, when the well runs dry, it is a good exercise to play with a single image.

Recently, I wrote that I didn’t feel complete with this painting, Softly She Prays. What could be a better source for the exercise than a painting that feels not-quite-complete? Kerri thinks I’m nuts and made me swear not to rework this piece. What could be a better reason to make new work from an old painting than the threat of violence from your wife?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s another study [18 x 14IN]Untitled Prayer

 

Underpainting

And, an underpainting for another version. The initial image may or may not remain the same. The fun is in what happens beneath. Or, better said as a life motto: it’s the process not the product. Eye-rolling phrases like that are why I am often banished to the studio. I do not take banishment personally. I know that I am hard to live with. Besides, banishment means more studies. Maybe in my next exile I’ll finish what I started in this study and it will be next week’s Melange addition.

[okay. I just showed this post the Kerri. She thinks the underpainting piece is cool and wants me to stop. She calls it Prayer Under Fire. She says it’s like you are melting away. Now what do I do?!]

 

 

For some meaningful/useful comments on the Blue Prayer, read Kerri’s blog post.

 

 

their palettes website box copy

 

blue prayer, study, and underpainting (OMG!) ©️ 2019 david robinson

softly she prays ©️ 2018 david robinson

Make Life Fun [on Chicken Marsala Monday]

notknowinghowtodoit WITH EYES jpeg copy

It used to make me profoundly sad when students would look at me in resistance and fear, saying the double-whammy, “I can’t! I don’t know how!” My next question always remained unvoiced: what have we done to you?

Curiosity is human nature. We are born hard-wired to sail toward scary edges, tinker with inventions, and attempt to grasp the un-graspable.  It takes a lot of work to blunt a child’s curiosity. It takes a concerted effort to transform vibrant imagination into fear of reprisal/shaming.

if you'd like to see more CHICKEN... copyThe good news is that curiosity might be contained but it never goes away. Chicken is here to remind us to step out of the cage, pick up the brush and splash the paint just to see what happens. His invitation is to to go do it – whatever it is – precisely because you don’t know how. The path to center leads directly through I Don’t Know How.

 

www.kerrianddavid.com

read Kerri’s blog post about NOT KNOWING HOW

not knowing how ©️ 2016 david robinson & kerri sherwood